Submissions to Chiaroscuro close in
The title Con[text] itself is a play on words "con" meaning with in Spanish and "text" referring to any written language.  Literal context is added to an image with the addition of words, numbers, letters.  Shots of billboards, graffiti, headstones or even the illusion of a letter or word counts.  The following examples have been shown at Darkroom Gallery in past exhibitions or provided by juror Tim Clark.
 

 © William Horton "The Perfect Perch"William Horton's The Perfect Perch is a perfect example of text naturally occurring and re-instating the origins of a subject. It adds a richness to the image and authenticates the windmill.


©Barbara Dombach "Sparrow"Barbara Dombach's The Sparrow is an example of two different kinds of text within the same image, handwriting is juxtaposed with the typeface of "June" in this dream-like image.

 

© Sean Stewart "Comfortable Alley no34"Sean Stewart's Comfortable Alley no34 is an example of an image with symbols that do not have legible words but the viewer knows they have meaning, obstruction of this meaning makes the photograph all the more mysterious. As this can also be true for text in a different language.

 © EJ Major, from the series Love is..... (published in issue 17 of 1000 Words Photography Magazine)

EJ Major, from the series Love is..... (published in issue 17 of 1000 Words Photography Magazine) is an example of collage. The artist took 2 found objects, in this case, mail and a iconic photograph and played them off one another along with a handwritten addition, it tells a unique story with all these multi layers at play.

 © Harold Ross "Flying Fish"

Harold Ross's "Flying Fish" is an example of a hidden symbol within an image. Can you see the letter T in this photograph? Do you think this is a happy mistake or a consious choice of Ross?

© Hugh Jones "Alice in Wonderland"

Hugh Jones' Alice in Wonderland is an example of numbers or letters creating an overall texture or pattern, adding another layer of meaning to the image.

© Fritzi Newton "If Doors Could Talk"

Fritzi Newton's If Doors Could Talk is an example of documentary photography that just so happens to have fragments of words in the found scene. When you are walking around with your camera you must capture some signage or logos in your shots, this is fair game for Con[text].

©Roz Leibowitz "Annie Julia or Life After Death"

Roz Leibowitz's Annie Julia or Life After Death is a construction of a taken image along with the artist's written word. This is indicative of the dadaist movement, informing the viewer of a specific context to analyze the image.

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