Exhibits

The title Con[text] itself is a play on words "con" meaning with in Spanish and "text" referring to any written language.  Literal context is added to an image with the addition of words, numbers, letters.  Shots of billboards, graffiti, headstones or even the illusion of a letter or word counts.  The following examples have been shown at Darkroom Gallery in past exhibitions or provided by juror Tim Clark.
 

 © William Horton "The Perfect Perch"William Horton's The Perfect Perch is a perfect example of text naturally occurring and re-instating the origins of a subject. It adds a richness to the image and authenticates the windmill.


©Barbara Dombach "Sparrow"Barbara Dombach's The Sparrow is an example of two different kinds of text within the same image, handwriting is juxtaposed with the typeface of "June" in this dream-like image.

 

© Sean Stewart "Comfortable Alley no34"Sean Stewart's Comfortable Alley no34 is an example of an image with symbols that do not have legible words but the viewer knows they have meaning, obstruction of this meaning makes the photograph all the more mysterious. As this can also be true for text in a different language.

 © EJ Major, from the series Love is..... (published in issue 17 of 1000 Words Photography Magazine)

EJ Major, from the series Love is..... (published in issue 17 of 1000 Words Photography Magazine) is an example of collage. The artist took 2 found objects, in this case, mail and a iconic photograph and played them off one another along with a handwritten addition, it tells a unique story with all these multi layers at play.

 © Harold Ross "Flying Fish"

Harold Ross's "Flying Fish" is an example of a hidden symbol within an image. Can you see the letter T in this photograph? Do you think this is a happy mistake or a consious choice of Ross?

© Hugh Jones "Alice in Wonderland"

Hugh Jones' Alice in Wonderland is an example of numbers or letters creating an overall texture or pattern, adding another layer of meaning to the image.

© Fritzi Newton "If Doors Could Talk"

Fritzi Newton's If Doors Could Talk is an example of documentary photography that just so happens to have fragments of words in the found scene. When you are walking around with your camera you must capture some signage or logos in your shots, this is fair game for Con[text].

©Roz Leibowitz "Annie Julia or Life After Death"

Roz Leibowitz's Annie Julia or Life After Death is a construction of a taken image along with the artist's written word. This is indicative of the dadaist movement, informing the viewer of a specific context to analyze the image.

Juror: Craig Blacklock


photo ©Craig Blacklock

"We are the children of our landscape."  - Lawrence Durrell

The land is always with us and we are a part of it, like it or not. From almost the very beginning human activity has had an influence on the natural landscape, sometimes subtle and sometimes blatantly destructive. The observation that the earth is now going through rapid changes is hard to refute. Though there's still some controversy over how much human activity is contributing to environmental change it's happening, and we as photographers are in the unique position of being able to document what was, what is, and what is to become. There's both ugliness and extreme beauty in the landscape, and its changing colors and forms, giving us the opportunity to create both art and statement.

 

Exhibit Calendar (Subject to Change)
Submissions Close:23 October 19 23:59 EST
Selections Announced:by 31 October 19
On-Line Check-in Due:1 November 19
Work Receipt Deadline:18 November 19
Exhibit Opens:21 November 19
Artists' Reception:7 December 19 16:00
Exhibit Closes:29 December 19
Submission Rules
Selection Process
How to make a Submission
Submit your work Now
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The Darkroom Gallery Difference

 For This Land we're looking for photos that express the connectivity of the individual, the photographer, to the world around. What do you see when you're hiking in the mountains or taking a walk in a city park?  How do you see it - through the scope of a wide angle lens or through details selectively framed? We'd like to see your expression of your connection to the land as well as your vision of your personal landscape. This will be deeply spiritual for some and more matter-of-fact for others; the important factor is presenting the world, your world, as you uniquely see it.

All selected entries are exhibited in our gallery and included in a full color exhibit catalog.

  • Juror's Choice receives a 30x48" vinyl exhibit banner featuring their image, free entry into a future exhibition and a free exhibition catalog.
  • Honorable Mentions receive free exhibition catalogs and free entry in a future exhibition. 
  • People's Choice gains free entry into a future exhibit.
  • We offer free matting and framing of accepted entries for the duration of each of our exhibition, subject to standard sizes.
  • Photographers set their own prices if they wish to sell their work and retain all rights to their photographs.

Juror: Craig Blacklock

Craig Blacklock is an internationally recognized fine art landscape photographer specializing in the interface of land and water. While he has photographed over much of the country, most of Blacklock’s 18 books have focused on wild areas of Lake Superior. His newest book, ST. CROIX & NAMEKAGON RIVERS — The Enduring Gift, celebrates the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Wild & Scenic Rivers Act, with the title essay by Vice President Walter F. Mondale, who as a senator, co-sponsored the Act. Blacklock’s photographs are widely exhibited, and included in many collections, including the Tweed Museum of Art and the Minnesota Marine Art Museum. His many awards include a Minnesota Book Award, 3 IPPYs, two PubWest Book Design Awards, many Midwest Book Awards, a Pinnacle Book Award, and an International Color Award (2nd place book category), and he was the 2018 recipient of the George Morrison Award from the Arrowhead Regional Arts Council. As a workshop instructor and lecturer, Craig has influenced thousands of photographers across the country.

 


 

 

 

Up next: 

 

This Land

Ordinary Things

Fantastic Visions

EXHIBIT NOW OPEN FROM October 18th 2019 to November 3rd 2019

An Exhibition of Photos of the Town Of Essex Including Essex Junction


Train Hop ©Ken Signorello

We want to see photos of your Essex for an exhibition at Darkroom Gallery.  What is it about Essex, the town, and Essex Junction, the village, that stand out in your mind, make them feel like home? Is it the fairgrounds, the big elm tree that marks the edge of Essex at Jericho or the old water tower on Route 15 where you first enter Essex when coming from Burlington? The park at Indian Brook? The Amtrak station? Or any one of the dozens of landmarks that dot the area? It's probably something more personal than that: the people you see every day in your neighborhood, the unique appearance of the street where you live, an especially attractive garden, dogs at play, children at play - the possibilities for photographic subjects are as endless as your vision and imagination.

There's no need to be an accomplished photographer or to have expensive equipment; your cellphone and your eyes are all that's necessary. Submit up to five images online, by email or drop them off at the gallery, 12 Main St. in Essex Junction.  We'll select at least one and display it the gallery from October 18 to November 3. There's no cost to enter. You can provide your own print or have us make one for you for a nominal fee. All photos entered must be the work of the entrant with one exception: Images of Essex past. Historic photos of Essex including Essex Junction are very welcome regardless of who took them; we want to see and share them.

The Details:

  • You don't have to be a resident of Essex, but your photos must have been taken in Essex including Essex Junction
  • Age doesn't matter. Minors will need a par­ent or guardian to submit their work. 
  • All levels of photographic experience are welcome.
  • Submission deadline is 11:59pm October 2, 2019. All entries must be received by the deadline; no exceptions!
  • All selected prints will be displayed at Darkroom Gallery from October 18 to November 2, 2019
  • All entries must be submitted on-line, by email or in person via any delivery method as long as they arrive on time.
  • Entries should be submitted as high quality JPGs no larger than 1280 pixels on the longest side.
  • You may submit your own prints as long as they are no larger than 11x14 inches, or you can have us make prints for you at a cost of $10 for 8x10 or 8x12 luster prints
  • Entry is free.
  • All selected entries will be displayed on our website, as well as in the gallery
  • There will be an artist's reception at the gallery and open to the public on Saturday, October 26 from 4pm to 6pm
  • Photographers may pick up their work at the gallery on or after November 3.

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